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I found this in my garden growing in well rotted wood chip. are they wood blewits?
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Found these in hampstead heath, wondered what they are/if they are edible? Thanks!
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Also from yesterday could the forum identify this. Pores didn't stain blue when poked but flesh streaks blue when first cut then turns an orange colou
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wildmushroomonline.co.uk Identifying Edible Mushrooms. The Hedgehog Fungus
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Copyright Malcolm Storey, www.bioimages.org.uk

Hedgehog fungus
Hydnum repandum

The pale Hedgehog Fungus, also known as the Wood Urchin, is a popular edible species, but it should be picked while young and free from worms and grubs. These quite large fungi grow in all kinds of damp woodland and can be found from late Summer to late Autumn. They are common in Europe, North America and Australia, and have been recorded in Japan and Korea. 

This delicacy is easily recognized by its pale orange-tan colours, terrestrial habitat, and the spines or "teeth" on the undersides of their caps. These take the place of the gills in the more familiar types of mushrooms, and serve the same function, to produce and release large quantities of spores, which the fungus uses for reproduction. The teeth form dense masses, and can look more like bristles - a characteristic which has given rise to the common name of hedgehog fungus. The teeth or spines start small and grow to about 5-6 mm. long. Hydnum repandum is one of the safest edible mushrooms, since it is so unmistakable, although it is easily mistaken for a faded chanterelle until you get a peek at the spiny underside. Viewed from above they can look like ordinary gilled mushrooms, but the underside is very distinctive.


 
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Wild Mushroom Identification - Recommended Books for All Skill Levels:
Every amateur mycologist should have a decent library of books, here are the top five books I highly recommend for wild mushroom identification:
 
1) Field Guide to Edible Mushrooms of Britain and Europe (Field Guides)  - Great layout with superb images - Peter Jordan
3) Mushrooms: A comprehensive guide to mushroom identification  - This one is a proper belter with loads and loads of good technical data - Roger Phillips
4) Complete Mushroom Book: The Quiet Hunt   - A lovely book by a lovely man. Antonio Carluccio
5) Mushrooms: River Cottage Handbook No.1 - Always a favourite from Hugh's fungi specialist friend, John Wright

It is important to have at least 3 books so you can cross reference and cover as many species as possible