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Anyone know if this mushroom is rare - can't find picture of one anywhere ?? Found the mushroom on a walk last Sunday in woodlands next to a grass fi
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Any ideas what this lil mushroom is? Found in a garden in Canterbury.
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I found this in my garden growing in well rotted wood chip. are they wood blewits?
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wildmushroomonline.co.uk How to Pick Wild Mushrooms
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wild mushrooms

There is a code of conduct amoungst fungi lovers to make sure we respect the area and try not to damage the delicate mychorrizal roots system.


General Pickers Rules 

  • Never pick a mushroom that you do not recognise in some way. It could be very rare. The recommended route is to photograph it in position and post it on the site to get identification.
  • Try to get permission if the land is private. Be VERY sure you are not over harvesting and check if the land is an SSSI. We have a massive problem these days of areas being denuded of wild food due to its popularity so we all have a collective responsibility to only take what we need adn if there are loads of pickers, move on to another area.
  • Follow the country code. i.e: close gates, don't leave a mark, be quiet and respectful.
  • Avoid moving dead wood around as it disturbes wildlife.
  • Don't go trampling on delicate plants when trying to get to fungi.
  • If you don't want to eat it, try to identify it in situation and do not pick it.
  • Cut fungi at the base with a knife rather than rip them out of the ground. this limits damage to the fungi threads.
  • Only collect a few from each troop - leave some for others and nature. Let's learn from the cod fishing industry experiences....


A last word about the legality of picking wild food - (this is mainly a rule in Wales but may cover the whole UK, it is best to know it anyway):

"Under common law it is not an offence to pick the “Four F’s”; fruit, foliage, fungi or flowers which are growing wild if they are for personal use and not for sale. This provision does not apply if the species in question is specially protected, say by listing in Schedule 8 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act. This means that anyone can pick blackberries, take ivy and holly for Christmas, gather sloes and pick mushrooms for themselves. However, this right can only be exercised where there is a legal right of access i.e. alongside public footpath or in a public place."

For a good round up of the general legal situation across Britain, see Truffle Trouble: Foraging law

Mushroom foraging equipment:

  • A knife, ideally one with a hooked inward blade to make cutting the stem easier, similar to a pruning knife
  • A brush to dust of any debris
  • A basket or paper bags, never use plastic as they sweat and spoil. Ideally a wicket basket
  • A walking stick, this is realy useful to move foliage back to save bending down when loooking under plants etc.
  • A wide brimmed hat, helps the eye to focus and cuts down glare from morning sun
  • A flask of tea ;-) foraging should be done at leisure and made enjoyable with time to asses the finds so far
  • Mushroom field guides (usually more than one for reference)




Here is a video (it's Swiss but still has relevant info for the UK) on picking fungi:





You can help others yourself, why not post in the "forager" section and share your revent foraging trip stories.

View all articles on this site here:http://www.wildmushroomsonline.co.uk/all-category-list/
 
 
 
Wild Mushroom Identification - Recommended Books for All Skill Levels:
Here are the top five books I highly recommend for wild mushroom identification:
 
1) Field Guide to Edible Mushrooms of Britain and Europe (Field Guides)  - Great layout with superb images - Peter Jordan
3) Mushrooms: A comprehensive guide to mushroom identification  - This one is a proper belter with loads and loads of good technical data - Roger Phillips
4) Complete Mushroom Book: The Quiet Hunt   - A lovely book by a lovely man. Antonio Carluccio
5) Mushrooms: River Cottage Handbook No.1 - Always a favourite from Hugh's fungi specialist friend, John Wright

It is important to have at least 3 books so you can cross reference and cover as many species as possible

Below is a range of Wild Food Foraging Books, Mushroom Growing Kits, Wild Product Production Kits  I Recoomend

Sit back and view the range, just hover your mouse over the image of you are interested and then click through to see more detail. You can scroll to find the item using the arrow next to the small images.

 

 





 
wildmushroomonline.co.uk Comments
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Posted By,  phillip on November 18,2009
 
great article - i am off to buy a book on wild mushrooms!
Posted By,  Keith on October 3,2012
 
Shouldn\'t the first sentence of your pickers advice read \"Never pick a mushroom that you do NOT recognise in some way.?
Posted By,  Nigel on October 3,2012
 
Thanks Keith! Error fixed, well spotted.
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Wild Mushroom Identification - Recommended Books for All Skill Levels:
Every amateur mycologist should have a decent library of books, here are the top five books I highly recommend for wild mushroom identification:
 
1) Field Guide to Edible Mushrooms of Britain and Europe (Field Guides)  - Great layout with superb images - Peter Jordan
3) Mushrooms: A comprehensive guide to mushroom identification  - This one is a proper belter with loads and loads of good technical data - Roger Phillips
4) Complete Mushroom Book: The Quiet Hunt   - A lovely book by a lovely man. Antonio Carluccio
5) Mushrooms: River Cottage Handbook No.1 - Always a favourite from Hugh's fungi specialist friend, John Wright

It is important to have at least 3 books so you can cross reference and cover as many species as possible